The startup Echometer: Making agile transformations succeed

Corporates are changing – just read the news around VW, Volvo and the ING bank to name a few. There is a simple reason – accelerating changes in global markets makes corporates’ agility a strategic priority.

Statistics confirm that 50% of german companies have started implementing agile methods and frameworks. But here comes the problem: Roughly ⅔ of such transformations fail.

How is that? Well, according to the “State of Agile” Study 2019, the biggest blocker for successful agile transitions are cultural issues – resistance to change and inadequate management support and sponsorship.

And this is where the startup Echometer comes in. It is a company I met recently as part of my advisor role at the Founders Foundation. As a Spin-off from the psychological department of the University of Münster, the startup has a unique perspective on agile: Focusing on employees and teams mindset. Echometer helps fostering the agile mindset in two ways.

The Founders team of Echometer, currently in the Accelerator program of the Founders Foundation (Bertelsmann Stiftung): Jean Michel Diaz, Robin Roschlau & Christian Heidemeyer.

Firstly, scrum masters and agile coaches, the change agents in such agile transformations, are supported in so called “retrospectives”. Retrospectives are regular team workshops, where teams come together to continuously improve. In these retrospectives, Echometer as a “digital coach” helps developing the team using scientific findings from psychology combined with artificial intelligence.

Echometer helps adopt agile methods in teams (retrospectives) as “digital coach”. As a by-product, the progress of the teams and overall transformation becomes measurable for agile coaches and management.

Secondly, by using the tool in retrospectives, the development of the team and transformation can be made visible – not only on team, but also on organizational level. That way, Echometer ensures that agile transformations become measurable in a way that is combinable with the agile philosophy of self-responsibility. Teams and managers get specific hints and tips about how they can help their teams grow – based on the Echometers learning algorithm in the background.

The Center of excellence of a leading high-end domestic appliances manufacturer has put the use of Echometer this way: 

“We use Echometer to gain transparency about cultural developments and to enable purposeful team discussions.” Source: Echometer

Co-Founder and CEO Jean Michel Diaz adds:

“While many companies have no clue, about how the transformation is going on an operational level, our customers have real-time insights and can be sure that agile teams support the transformation with a buttom-up continuous improvement process (!) – which is even more important.” Source: Echometer

Christian Heidemeyer, organisational psychologist and one of the Co-Founders of Echometer, recently visited the Barcamp of the ING (see picture). While the bank is one of the most popular examples of a corporate implementing agile methods and frameworks company-wide (see McKinsey, 2017), they agreed that agile mindset is a huge field to continuously work on.

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Christian Heidemeyer, organisational psychologist and Co-Founder of Echometer, was invited as a guest to present Echometer at the ING Barcamp in January 2020.

Seems like Echometer is heading in the right direction.

If you want to learn more about Echometer, check out www.echometer.de or follow them on LinkedIn, Facebook or Twitter.

When is the last time you reflected on motivation and how to build lasting perfomance in your team?

Over the last years I have repeatedly encountered 3 words defining the current notion for motivation: 1. Autonomy, 2. Mastery, 3. Purpose. This notion has often appeared in presentations about tech culture, notably at Zalando (thanks Eric Bowman) but also often emerges in company cultures such as the one at Solvemate (thanks Christian Blomberg).

So I carried the notion with me till I felt urgency to go beyound the simple words. Ultimately I landed at presumably the source of it: the book “Drive” by Daniel Pink.

Without telling you too much and spoiling the read here are some of my takeaways for motivation:

  • Motivation 2.0 in the form of carrot and stick (rewards based) is inefficient and unpredicatable.
  • Motivation 3.0 defined by the 3 aforementioned words offers the ruleset for maintaining performance and job satisfaction of a present day person.
    • Meaning of Autonomy – to hold your life/job with your hands and direct it the way you deem necessary.
    • Meaning of Mastery – to constantly learn and improve on a subject that matters.
    • Meaning of Purpose – to dedicate to something bigger than our own self.
  • Motivation 3.0 seems to almost always outeprform Motivation 2.0. Even in the short term.
  • FedEx days at Atlassian. Nowadays called ShipIt this is a day long retreat for evey engineer in the company to create a new solution or fix something that annoys them. Execution matters but best idea wins.
  • The concept of ROWE – results only work environment, or else said no time keeping (check in/out).
  • Super clear and stripped down to the basics insights from Jim Collins (by the way also a great author) about self-motivation – 4 simple rules how to instigate such culture.

On the matter of ROWE quite curious how many companies run this model, it seems to be getting good traction in creative industries. Yet, wondering whether teams do not alienated by not spending time together.

Anyway, I highly recommend this book and plan to revert to it from time to time. Have you read it and what do you think?

IdeaFox – an innovation management platform for teams to co-create and implement solutions

In the process of building new digital business models I often revert to the business canvas template and generate a ton of MS Word/Excel docs and series of email threads in that process.

IdeaFox seems to deal with all that. I knew about the platform quite some years ago but got to lay my hands on it just recently (should have done earlier though). It has managed to put away most of the aforementioned overboard and gave quite an orderly look to my creative chaos.

IdeaFox is cloud based and covers all steps from collective ideation, co-creation and evaluation, to idea realization. It is simple and easy to use platform. I started a new project within minutes and is quite intuitive (whoever knows me, would sigh how rarely I actually say this).

But just in case you need a tutorial, here is one.

It can actually do more than I do with it. IdeaFox allows idea challenges, idea realization in a stage gate processes, or collection of best practices.

Typical users seems to be innovation and digitization teams (like I am), but also teams collecting ideas for operational improvements.

In sum, IdeaFox solves three needs of organizations that want to get better:

  • Get better solutions by efficiently connecting a broad group of participants
  • Improve realization of ideas and get up to 20% quicker (claim by IdeaFox)
  • Increase employee engagement and foster transparent communication

I also tend to know the two lovely people behind the platform so this is yet another argument for me to give IdeaFox a try if you need such a platform.

Meet Dörte and Aron

Looking forward to your feedback and please share your impressions.

If you want to learn more about IdeaFox, check out ideafox.io or follow them on LinkedIn or FB.

You can find the rest of my articles either on LinkedIn or on my website: https://starkfounders.com. Enjoy!

Meet Lytt, the digital assistant that empowers employees to speak up when something is not right

The #Metoo movement and the increasing number of scandals in tech companies and political organisations, evidently became more urging for employers than ever before. But still, employees who experience discrimination and other inappropriate situations in the workplace rarely address these issues. Research shows that more than half of all cases are never reported due to fear of retaliation or career disadvantage.

Employees do not trust in internal incident-resolving processes and as a result rather leave the company than report what happened.

That’s what Lytt aims to tackle. Lytt is an AI-enabled digital assistant that helps employees to talk about inappropriate experiences at work. It guides users through the process of reporting incidents or concerns, can provide first aid, clarify doubts and even give simple legal advice. After talking to Lytt, the employee is in full control of what happens with the report. Lytt can connect them anonymously to a chat with an internal confidant or even an external expert in the field of the incident.

Marvin and Lara, the founders of Lytt.

That enables employees to address difficult topics in a safe and anonymous way, such as cultural issues, unconscious bias, harassment, discrimination or bullying. At the same time, Lytt empowers companies to identify health risks and conflicts early on, reduce personnel costs and prevent financial risk and image damage. Moreover, it provides the employer with a comprehensive KPI dashboard where all cases are anonymously outlined. This helps to create valuable insights on a company’s working climate and gives automated strategic recommendations for improving corporate culture.

To achieve this Lytt harnesses the power of conversational interfaces with deep learning elements – a promising application of AI. Building a smart chatbot with the ability to process natural language allows to provide helpful advice or clarify possible legal steps without revealing the user’s identity.

Below is an overview of the incident management app.

And below is an overview of the resulting consulting.

The digital assistant does not judge or forward a case unless you explicitly ask for it. It is always available and allows access via employer-individual progressive web app to really make sure employees can talk to Lytt with any device and from anywhere, whenever they feel ready for it. Those who experienced an incident are often unsure whether they should bother someone or if their report would even be relevant.

At the present time, Lytt is focused on offering consulting, mediation and workshops for companies in order to effectively counterpart those problems as well. However there is a lot more planned.

If you want to learn more about Lytt, check out www.lytt.de/en or follow them on LinkedIn, FB or Twitter.

Founders Hack was in Bielefeld and it was great!

Some (or none) of you may have wondered what was I doing on a mid-June weekend. Me being me, I went to the city of Bielefeld and mentored in the first Founders Hack. It was a typical gloomy German weekend, yet the hackathon was probably the best thing I have seen in a while.

The best part of the hackathon were actually the teams. I was impressed with the stunning mix of experienced business professionals and pumped up techies. In fact each team without exception managed to deliver a well thought over and absolutely uptodate solution.

It started during the day.

And went on during the night. Some went on till 4am.

A big differentiator to other hackathons were the real life challenges. They were drawn from actual opportunities (or problems) and provided by industry leaders from the Bielefeld area: Wortmann, Miele, Boge, Alcina, Benteler, Claas.

Some went a step further e.g. Boge impressed by bringing an actual product to make the teams play with their machine.

Challenges focused on IoT and machine learning with 2 prominent IoT ones being: 1) build an IoT based business model for the laundry care in sharing economy, and 2) track spare- & wear parts in a complex machine. Then the machine learning challenges explored using external data sources to track fashion trends and ways to increase efficiency in farming with data from agricultural engines.

The final delivery was in the form of a short pitch in front of the cheering crowd in a fully packed theater. And the prize was a unicorn!

Now add to this the fantastic Lasse Chor who orchestrated the event with a ton of great vibes and the tiresome Founders Foundation team, and you have an unforgettable weekend.

This event has definitely left a mark. I believe it is the first time when I saw corporates connect with startups and take over the initiatives into their agenda. For me the secret sauce to make this work would be well summed up with few words: curated team building, well defined areas of interest and business opportunities for the corporates, unhindered access to corporate executives, energising moderation and mentoring.

Most importantly, there was plenty of food. Just kidding but there was indeed good food :). All the time!

Before

and after

“This is Bielefeld” – these are the true words of Jackson Bond from Relayr, the word is spreading. One thing is clear, entrepreneurship is no longer reserved for Berlin, Hamburg, München and Cologne.